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Aging and cell death in the other yeasts, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Candida albicans

Su-Ju Lin, Nicanor Austriaco
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1567-1364.12113 119-135 First published online: 1 February 2014


How do cells age and die? For the past 20 years, the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been used as a model organism to uncover the genes that regulate lifespan and cell death. More recently, investigators have begun to interrogate the other yeasts, the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and the human fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, to determine if similar longevity and cell death pathways exist in these organisms. After summarizing the longevity and cell death phenotypes in S. cerevisiae, this mini-review surveys the progress made in the study of both aging and programed cell death (PCD) in the yeast models, with a focus on the biology of S. pombe and C. albicans. Particular emphasis is placed on the similarities and differences between the two types of aging, replicative aging, and chronological aging, and between the three types of cell death, intrinsic apoptosis, autophagic cell death, and regulated necrosis, found in these yeasts. The development of the additional microbial models for aging and PCD in the other yeasts may help further elucidate the mechanisms of longevity and cell death regulation in eukaryotes.

  • aging
  • cell death
  • Saccharomyces cerevisiae
  • Candida albicans
  • Schizosaccharomyces pombe
  • apoptosis
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